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Glacier fall at Bondhusbreen.

Bondhusdalen

19.12.2018

The Bondhus area in Maruanger has been a magnet for tourists ever since the stream of tourists to Norway's west coast began in the middle of the 1800s. The magnificent landscape with the "ice trail" up to Bondhusvatnet Lake, the ice falls from Bondhusbreen glacier and Keisarstigen trail up to Folgefonna are still popular tourist attractions.

Gildrehola

Gildrehola

12.03.2018

The Halsnøy Boat

19.06.2018

From Upper Musland toward Geitadalen.

Ulvanosa

04.01.2019

Some mountains have rounded shapes, while others have steep slopes and sharp edges. Ulvanosa (1246 mos.) has both. The forms reflect the type of bedrock below, and the forces that were in effect when they were formed.

Mine hole above Kvitebergsvatnet Lake, by Atramadalen.

Ølve- Mining

05.01.2019

All in all there are ten known copper mines and two iron mines on the Ølve peninsula. Geologically, the nine mines on Varaldsøy Island also should be figured in. The industry began at Lilledal in 1642 wth the mining of iron ore. From Jernsmauget by Dyråsen, the iron ore was sent to the iron works in eastern Norway.

At lake Gaupåsvatnet.

Gaupås

19.05.2018

Marmorøyen

05.12.2018

Fra Blåmanen mot Vardegga og Ulriken.

Vidden

07.12.2018

Langavatnet, Åsane (Svein Nord)

Åsane

05.12.2018

Most associate Åsane with ridges, naturally enough (the Norwegian word for "ridge" is "Ås"). A lesser noticed trait in the landscape are the unusual flat areas that lie between the ridges. The Dalselva River, which was channeled at the end of the 1950s, runs down only 2.5 metres from Lake Langavatnet by Vågsbotn to Flatevad, where it goes over into rapids by Fossekleiva. The layers of gneiss stand nearly vertically, and the mountain surface is so even that one might think it had been planed with a planer.

Hereiane. Jonahornet in the background.

Hereiane

26.05.2018

At Hereiane on warm summer days one you can walk barefoot up the hill from the fjord all the way up to 400 metres elevation. The naked, furrowed bedrock often causes travellers who see it from the north side of the fjord to wonder. Why does it look like this, and why is there so little that grows here? It is a long way to the heavy metal industry in Ålvik and Odda, and there hasn’t been a forest fire in modern times.

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