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From Upper Musland toward Geitadalen.

Ulvanosa

04.01.2019

Some mountains have rounded shapes, while others have steep slopes and sharp edges. Ulvanosa (1246 mos.) has both. The forms reflect the type of bedrock below, and the forces that were in effect when they were formed.

Ground up bedrock in the Valen Fault, seen under a microscope.

The Valen Fault

04.01.2019

Gjønavatnet and Kikedalen

Gjønavatnet and Kikedalen

16.06.2018

The saw tooth pattern is clearly visible from Skora Mountain southwards toward Tellnes and Skogsvågen.

Haganes

12.06.2018

The gneiss landscape west and north of Bergen viewed in profile can remind us of a saw blade of the kind that has long, slanted sides that get broken off shorter transverse sides. It has taken several hundred million years to file this saw blade, an enduring interplay between various geological processes.

Romarheimsdalen

Romarheimsdalen

29.03.2018

Section from a sea map from the Danish Sea Map Archive from 1798, drawn by Poul Løvernørn.

Fitjarøyane

18.06.2018

If we study the group of islands south of Selbjørns Fjord from the air or on a sea map, we will notice that many of the islands are elongated and lie systematically in rows. The islands are divided by long sounds, for example Trollosen, Nuleia and Hjelmosen, which are oriented in a south-southeast to north-northwesterly direction.

Landskapsdraget sørover langs Krokavatnet og Bjørndalsvida i Etnefjella følgjer Etneforkastinga

Krokavatnet

06.03.2019

On Sunday the 29th of January, 1989, at 17:38 o'clock, Etna shook. The earthquake, with its epicentre ca. 9 kilometres south of Etne centre, had a strength of 4.2 on the Richters scale. This could be felt over large parts of West Land, especially in the areas around Åkra, Etne, Hardanger Fjord and Sauda Fjord. The earthquake was the largest that has ever been measured in Hordaland.