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The longhouse at Førland

Førland

21.11.2018

The extended farm dwelling at Hopland

Hopland

03.01.2019

The farmhouses at holding No. 15 at Hopland are built together to form a long, continuous building, with dwelling house, hayshed and cowshed built in one row. There have been many such joined structures in the coastal communities, but today there are few remaining. If we travel to the other side of the North Sea, to the Faeroes, Shetland and the Orkney Islands, we find corresponding features in the older building traditions. We find ourselves in a large North Atlantic cultural area.

Drawing: longhouse, Sætre

Sætre

16.06.2018

Isdalstunet, Lindås

Isdal

16.06.2018

Isdal one of the few clustered settlements left in the Hordaland communities, after the extensive changes taking place around the turn of the former century, which broke up the shared farms and the old intermixture of strips. The old, low houses are situated in a compact enclosure, which is very noticeable in the landscape when you travel the main road north from Knarrvik.

The longhouse at Litleoksa

Litleoksa

16.06.2018

Barn with stone end wall

Andviki

19.05.2018

The “Bualoft” at Kjetland from the 1600s or 1700s.

Kjetland

17.06.2018

Door

Trodalen

17.06.2018

The marine shed at Hollmeknappe, Meland

Holmeknappen

17.06.2018

If you come by sea to Bergen and come up the Herdle Fjord, the yellow ochre marine shed at Holmeknappen is a well known landmark to starboard as you come close to the little shore settlement. In olden days Holmenknappen served important functions as a centre for a wide hinterland of the surrounding farms, warehouse, landing point, country store and later a steamer quay, a hotel (1896) and a dairy (1909). But today Holmeknappen is no longer a focal point. Transport and commercial routes have changed the old pattern

The smithy at Odland, Meland

Odland

17.06.2018

The auger smithies in Odland and Fosse were amongst those which had the largest production of augers in the period between the Wars. Martinus Fosse built a smithy in 1877, and this was in operation right up to the 1980s - one of the centres for auger production in Meland. In 1930 yet another smithy was built here. There was a smithy at Fossesjøen as early at the 18th century, and at the end of the 19th century they went over to auger smithing. There is still a market for hand-forged augers.

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