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Sculptures in the bedrock

Herand- geologi

11.12.2018

Vøringsfossen waterfall and the Upper Måbødalen Valley, as seen from the viewpoint at Hotel Fossli.

Måbødalen- geology

29.11.2018

The old pack road had 1500 steps, where cars today gas through the mountain. The time of this hard work is over, and of getting used to the steep terrain, as well; only the view from the top is much the same as before. Vøringsfossen in summer is one of Western Norway’s biggest natural wonders. It marks the transition between the older, open part of the Sysendalen valley and the younger, narrow and winding valley of Måbødalen.

Skytjedalen in Eidfjord.

Skytjedalen

03.01.2019

Potholes

Hausberget

31.03.2018

The contrast between phyllite and Precambrian basement is clearly visible at Lussand.

Lussand- geology

30.11.2018

Hardangerfjorden kløyver Hordaland i to. Den etter måten rettlinja fjorden skjer seg liksom på skeive inn i landet. Ikkje som Sognefjorden og Nordfjord – dei krokar og buktar seg innover meir eller mindre vinkelrett på kysten. Hardangerfjordens utforming har røter 400 millionar år tilbake i tida, då den veike sona i fjellet, der isen seinare tok grådig for seg, vart danna. Denne sona stig på land ved Lussand.

Skjervet toward the east. Jørdre Farm up to the left.

Skjervet- river theft

02.12.2018

At the end of the last ice age the ice flowed out of Hardanger fjord in such a fury that it forced the meltwater from Voss to run back uphill toward Granvin. The glacier from Raundalen down the windy valley along the Vosso to Bolstadøyri went too slow to make the turn.

The soil tongues below Jomfrunuten.

Jomfrunuten

03.12.2018

Freezing and thawing are processes that influence plant cover, move enormous blocks, stretche long mounds of earth, break open bedrock and create patterns in stone and earth.

Glacial river plain at Lake Klevavatnet.

Rallarvegen

04.12.2018

They rest there, all as one, the silent witnesses of Western Norway's saga of creation: Precambrian basement, phyllite and thrust sheet. In the end came the glaciers and sculptured the vast landscape. Along the ground or on the horizon, from bicycle or on foot - the landscape tells its story - and it tells it clearer on Rallarvegen than many other places.

Cirque in Dyrdal in Lindås

Dyrdal

13.12.2018

If you journey along Austfjorden, you at the same time turn the pages of time back through Ice Age history. The landforms show how the landscape has developed gradually as the glaciers have grown - and melted again - in several episodes: from small cirques, we see innermost at Dyrdal, to larger fjords, like at Mas fjord further out.

Eclogite bedrock at Ådnefjellet.

Eldsfjellet

13.12.2018

The eclogites in western Norway were formed when Precambrian basement rocks were squeezed and pressed down under great pressure deep under the Caledonian mountain chain. The process may well have triggered some of the deepest earthquakes the world has ever known. The clearest traces of this drama are found in and around Mt. Eldsfjellet, in peaceful Meland.

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