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The longhouse at Førland

Førland

21.11.2018

The extended farm dwelling at Hopland

Hopland

03.01.2019

The farmhouses at holding No. 15 at Hopland are built together to form a long, continuous building, with dwelling house, hayshed and cowshed built in one row. There have been many such joined structures in the coastal communities, but today there are few remaining. If we travel to the other side of the North Sea, to the Faeroes, Shetland and the Orkney Islands, we find corresponding features in the older building traditions. We find ourselves in a large North Atlantic cultural area.

Kjelstraumen today

Kjelstraumen

16.06.2018

If you take the sea route north you have several options. The various routes have been dealt with in history, and through the Middle Ages the traffic increased as well as the trading with Nordland in fish and herring, feather and down. One of the central routes passes through Kjelstraumen, in the sound between Ulvøy and Bakkøy. This has been a place for a guesthouse since 1610, with Royal Letter of Privilege, part of the large network of trading post and guesthouse locations along the coast.

The mill that belonged to Johan Steinegger in Kvalvågen in Lindås, an attempt to exploit the difference in tides

Kvalvågen

16.06.2018

The marine use environment on Krossøy, Austrheim

Krossøy

16.06.2018

Furthest north in the island community Rongevær, at the entrance to Fensfjorden, lies Krossøy. Belonging to the farm are the islands of Krossøy, Husøy, Kårøy, Lyngkjerringa, Søre Kjerringa, Rotøy and Kuhovet. All of them have been inhabited. On Krossøy itself today there are four holdings. The marine use environment here is one of the best preserved along the West Norwegian coast.

The Hopland mills around 1940.

Kvernhusvågen

30.03.2018

Drawing: longhouse, Sætre

Sætre

16.06.2018

Hellisøy lighthouse, Fedje

Hellisøy

16.06.2018

Hellisøy lighthouse was lit for the first time in 1855. The characteristic red cast-iron tower with two white belts is 33m high and a light height of 46m above high tide.

Kræmmerholmen photographed in early 1900.

Kræmmerholmen

16.06.2018

Kræmmerholmen is one of the old privileged trading posts. From the 1600s all trading in West Norway took place in Bergen, and the farmers were obliged to travel into town in order to sell their produce and buy what they needed. In Bergen City Privilege of 1702 the merchants in the city were allowed to establish “Trading posts in the countryside”. The owner had to have residency in Bergen and the trading post was to be run by an assistant. In this way the city retained financial control of those living in the districts, and not least with buying and selling of fish.

The D/S Oster and D/S Børøysund

Alverstraumen

19.06.2018

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