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Holmengrå

Holmengrå

07.12.2018

Holmengrå is the only place in Hordaland where we find traces of the abrasion that is supposed to have transformed Western Norway from a Himalaya-like high mountain landscape during the earth's Paleozoic Era, to a flat lowlands terrain during the Mezosoic Era. Just 400 million years ago, large and small stones plummeted down from the high mountains. Some of these stones became incorporated into the conglomerate bedrock on Holmengrå.

Lurøyane

Lurøyane

16.06.2018

The geology along Oster Fjord and further eastward, in cross-section and on the surface. (Haakon Fossen)

Stall

11.12.2018

The Bergen Arcs have an unusually sharp boundary to the bedrock in the east. Geologists think that this was caused by movements in the earth's crust during the Devonian Period. Then, the Bergen Arcs on the Lindås peninsula sank a whole 10 kilometres in relation to the Precambrian basement gneisses on the east side of Fens Fjord and Aust Fjord.

Bjørn West-museum

Matre- Bjørn West museum

17.06.2018

Eclogite bedrock at Ådnefjellet.

Eldsfjellet

13.12.2018

The eclogites in western Norway were formed when Precambrian basement rocks were squeezed and pressed down under great pressure deep under the Caledonian mountain chain. The process may well have triggered some of the deepest earthquakes the world has ever known. The clearest traces of this drama are found in and around Mt. Eldsfjellet, in peaceful Meland.

From Osterøy museum

Gjerstad

18.06.2018

Litlandsvatnet

13.12.2018

Large quantities of nickel ore have been mined from Litlandsvatnet, between Lonevågen and Hosanger. The discovery was made in 1875. During the period of operation from 1882 to 1945, 4170 tonnes of pure nickel were extracted from 462 000 tonnes of ore, a large production by Norwegian standards.

Manger

Manger

18.06.2018

Mangerite is a rock type that was first made famous in a treatise by the Bergen geologist Carl Fredrik Kolderup in 1903. The rock type got its name from the place where it was found, and has made the Mangerud name well known around the world, at least among geologists.

Garnets at Vågenes

Vågenes

18.06.2018

On Vågenes, on one of the prominences out toward Eitrevågen, one finds garnets in anorthosite. The garnets are both older, and not least bigger, than average.

Kjerringafjellet

Bergsdalen

13.12.2018

The mountains of western Norway are lovely to wander in. In Cambro-Silurian time it was the mountain itself that wandered. The mountain, or more correctly the bedrock, first moved eastward, then back a bit westward again. All this rocking back and forth in the mountains ended about 400 million years ago.

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